New market square in Dresden


size(cm): 50x85
Price:
Sale price£228 GBP

Description

Painting New Market Square in Dresden by artist Bernardo Bellotto is a masterpiece of Baroque art that captivates viewers with its majestic composition and masterful use of color. This work of art, original size 136 x 236 cm, is one of Bellotto's most famous and is considered one of the most important in the collection of the National Gallery in Dresden.

Bellotto's artistic style is characterized by its precision in the representation of architectural and urban details. In the New Market Square in Dresden, Bellotto shows his ability to capture the beauty of the city of Dresden in the 18th century. The painting shows a panoramic view of the city market, with its historic buildings and lively merchants and passers-by.

The composition of the painting is impressive, with a carefully drawn perspective taking the viewer through the market and towards the horizon. Bellotto uses a rich and vibrant color palette to bring the scene to life, with warm, earthy tones reflecting the atmosphere of the period.

The history of the painting is equally fascinating. It was created in 1748 at the request of King Augustus III of Poland, who was a great admirer of Bellotto's work. The painting was exhibited at the Royal Palace in Dresden and became one of the most popular works in the royal collection.

Despite its huge popularity, there are little-known aspects of the painting that make it even more interesting. For example, Bellotto is known to have made several preliminary sketches and studies before beginning the final work, demonstrating his dedication and commitment to his art. It is also believed that the painting was restored several times over the years, which has allowed it to remain in excellent condition to this day.

In short, New Market Square in Dresden is a masterpiece of Baroque art that showcases Bernardo Bellotto's talent and skill as an artist. Its artistic style, masterful composition, use of color and the story behind the painting make it one of the most important works in the collection of the Dresden National Gallery.

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